Friday, September 30, 2016

New Poetry Mag Launches - The Scores

H/T Roy Marshall

Click through to The Scores
A new biannual Poetry Magazine has launched called The scores.  It's run out of the University of St Andrews Scotland and crewed by the students of the MFA course there,

" under an advisory team of esteemed professors and instructors both in and beyond the programme."
Don Paterson is one of the names I recognize and he writes the foreword to the first edition.

You can read it here.

This first issue contains a number of well known poets including Helen Mort (one of my faves) and also features an advice column from Clive James in the form of  Letter to a Young Poet.

I have tried to find their guidelines for submissions, but that area of the website seems to be under construction at the moment.

Paterson, in his foreword does indicate that it will have an international reach/flavour.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

New Scottish Poetry Podcast Interview with Sarah Howe

Love Sarah's collection and here she talks with Jennifer Williams and reads a couple of her poems from that it. It's good discussion. Thank me later.


Naomi Shihab Nye on the Art of Teaching Poetry


This post is for the Poet Teachers who might follow the blog, or for those planning to run a poetry group that involves some sort of instruction.

It offers some hints on the basic tools you need to teach poetry, to impart an enjoyment of poetry

Enjoy!

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Year of Poetry Update - Week 38

Thought I should buy this 
This week I started revising my basic Japanese so that I can teach an introduction to Japanese Culture and Language next term. 

My brain is aching then, from running hot.

The Poet Tree has sprouted some more poems as you can see from the photo below. 

And I have managed to redraft a poem to a grinding halt, but more on that later.

My library order of ABR (Australian Book Review )came in, which led to the bank account getting a work out after reading some good reviews.  

As noted in a previous post the interview I did with Alice Alan went live this past week and I have had some good feedback from commenters on FB and Twitter.

If you are keen for some more podcasty goodness, Alice and Michelle Seminara have an interview with the wonderful PS Cottier over at Verity La.



The Writing

This week I continued redrafting the poem that I was redrafting last week and implemented  a couple of suggestions from the section on drafting in Ron Pretty's Creating Poetry.

Most significantly the suggestion of using anecdote to expand the poem and give it additional emotional weight. I quite like what I did with that part of the poem but it did upset the rhythm or perhaps, more honestly, made me realize how staid the rhythm sounded.

On the submissions front - still no news


The Study

Guerrilla Poetry in action 

I finished noting the chapter on drafting from Creating Poetry and read and noted the chapter on poetic language. 

There wasn't so much that was new to me in this chapter but its always nice to read subtle reminders, in the form of TS Eliot quotes, on ways we should approach poetic language.


Close Reading

Managed to finish off my reading of Blackout from  Earth Girls.  I heartily recommend you buy the collection from Pitt Street Poetry.



For the Statbadgers:


Total time: 5:09 (391:22) hrs


poem writing = 2.40 (178:56) hrs

close reading =0:42(78:44) hrs

technique/theory 1:22(88:35) hrs

reflection = 0:25 (31:58) hrs



Poetry written:

0(34) poems completed


(1)16 poems in draft


1 poem abandoned


1 poem facing execution at dawn



Poems Submitted:


0(19 in total) poems



Poems Published:


0(7) poem



Live Performances:
0(2)


Interviews:
0(1)


Rejections:


0(8) poems

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Poetry Says - featuring Me (fans self)


The very kind Alice Allan from Poetry Says interviewed me for her podcast, you can catch me at Episode 18 talking about Kay Ryan, my poetry process and reading one of my poems.

This week South Australian poet SB Wright gets real about the fact that perfect poetry doesn’t happen the moment the pen hits the page. Sean’s spending a year focusing on poetry, which leads us to Ira Glass’s advice on the gap between taste and ability, William Stafford’s A Way of Writing, fixed vs. growth mindsets and Jo Bell’s poetry checklist.   
Read on 

Monday, September 19, 2016

Try a Poem - Short Poetry reviews from Jen Campbell

Here's Jen Campbell covering 5 new books of poetry in about 9 minutes. She presents 5 books that she's recently bought, reads a poem from each and then gives us here reasoning for continuing on to read one or two of the selected works.

 

The books that Jen mentions are:


  • The Year of Yellow Butterflies by Joanna Fuhrmann
  • Girl Show by Kristy Bowen 
  • The Devil’s Bookshop by David Kennedy 
  • The Good Dark by Ryan Van Winkle 
  • Two Yvonnes by Jessica Greenbaum 

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Year of Poetry Update - Week 37

This week was a little less productive than last but still quite good for what has become the standard ritual of Sunday plus a weekday afternoon of writing.

I also engaged in some guerrilla poetry at my library, constructing a Poet Tree and delegating staff to cut out green paper in the shape of leaves so that community members and school children could write short poetry and place it on the tree.  

I will post a picture when the tree has sprouted some more leaves.


The Writing

This week I spent all my writing time redrafting a short poem that I considered mostly complete. This was undertaken for the purpose of trying out the suggested techniques in Ron Pretty's book.  I am happy with the result and will continue on tomorrow as the close reading begun today has me considering that I am pretty one dimensional in my presentation of the senses.

On the submissions front - no news is good news.


The Study


As mentioned last week I received Ron Pretty's Creating Poetry, so much of this weeks 30 minute portion of study was spent reading and noting his section on drafting. Here he takes the drafts of several Australian poets and looks at the differences between the various stages - what was added, the techniques that they use, etc.


Close Reading

My copy of Lisa Brockwell's Earth Girls turned up on Monday so today I spent an hour doing a close reading of her poem Blackout.  I am particularly impressed with her use of the senses in this poem and of sense switching i.e. when you begin describing things that are normally perceived in one sense in terms of another.


For the Statbadgers:


Total time: 4:35 (386:13) hrs


poem writing = 2.30 (176:16) hrs

close reading =1:00(78:02) hrs

technique/theory 0:30(87:13) hrs

reflection = 0:35 (31:33) hrs



Poetry written:

0(34) poems completed


(1)16 poems in draft


1 poem abandoned


1 poem facing execution at dawn



Poems Submitted:


0(19 in total) poems



Poems Published:


0(7) poem



Live Performances:
0(2)


Interviews:
0(1)


Rejections:


0(8) poems

Friday, September 16, 2016

Olena Kalytiak Davis: "I Was Minor"

Preorder at Booktopia 
I was listening to the Poetry Says Podcast yesterday morning. One of those short casts that Alice does
about about how to approach poetry, or about particular poets she finds interesting - just Alice and her thoughts.

You should go and listen.

She mentioned the Alaskan poet, Olena Kalytiak Davis, and has happened previously in listening to this podcast my interest was piqued.

I have requested that SA libraries get the ebook of Olena's latest collection as a result, but I fear that I may just have to buy it myself (seriously these free podcasts are getting expensive).

So below is the poem I believe Alice mentioned in her podcast.  You can read it below or click the speaker icon at the top and launch a Soundcloud recording of the same poem.


 

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Sarah Kay - "Private Parts"

A really beautiful poem by Sarah Kay

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

On drafting - a year of poetry epip...efip...thought.

I am going to be honest here.

Up until yesterday I was a rather linear drafter.   I suspect this comes from my schooling and from work; having to proof things and where you are really focused on pushing or taking a document in one direction.

After reading Creating Poetry by Ron Pretty, in particular the section on drafting, I experimented in redrafting a poem that in truth, I was pretty much finished with.  The idea here was to explore the possibilities in the poem or try and see if I could take it in another direction.

Now that may lead nowhere or somewhere weird and uncomfortable or I might just write the best thing I have done to date.  The important thing though was I think to break away, at least a little, from that linear focus which narrows a poem as I go further down the track.

So my question to you readers is, do your draft linearly aiming generally in one direction or have you experimented, turning a poem on it's head going in multiple directions?

And another question: do you think typing directly in a digital document influences this?

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Stephen Oliver performs Real

We listened to the facilitator read this poem at a cultural awareness day. Glad I was able to track down this performance


 



Saturday, September 10, 2016

Let's Chat | What Makes A Poem "Good"? | AD

Jen, on what makes a good poem. Jen is judging Costa Book Awards (poetry) this year.

Year of Poetry Update - Month 9

Jesus! It's the 3/4 mark. 

My copy of Stuart Barnes' Glasshouses arrived, not that I had much time to read any of it - much non poetry related study was done this week in preparation for a training and development day. 

As I mentioned earlier in the week Booktopia had a free shipping deal that's running till midnight next Monday.

After last week's ball of poetry love, this week felt, understandably, a bit dull.  I did manage to get some extra writing done as a consequence of a shortened school week. About two hours extra in fact.


The Writing


I finished of the poem inspired by my wife's anxiety of filling census forms from last week.  It's been left on the shelf to age. I also managed to write another poem inspired, in tone at least, from having watched Howl and read the first section of Ferlinghetti's A Coney Island of the Mind.  It was one of those poems that flows out in a white hot rage, so it's potentially shit and I decided to send it out straight away, which I almost never do.  Time will tell.

I also submitted three poems which means there's sure to be a slight landslide of rejections in the near future.  It did feel good though to have some more poems out circulating.

The Study

I completed reading the chapter My Emily Dickinson in  Mary Ruefle's, Madness Rack and Honey. A curious chapter that somehow manages to weave the lives of Emily Dickinson, Emily Bronte and Anne Frank together and make it relevant to writing poetry.

Creating Poetry by Ron Pretty arrived from the Library on Tuesday and leafing through it I have spotted some interesting chapters worthy of a closer inspection.


Close Reading


I didn't mange to get around to any close reading.



For the Statbadgers:


Total time: 5:55 (381:38) hrs


poem writing = 4.30 (173:46) hrs

close reading =0:00(77:02) hrs

technique/theory 0:55(86:43) hrs

reflection = 0:30 (29:58) hrs



Poetry written:

2(35) poems completed


(0)16poems in draft


1 poem abandoned


1 poem facing execution at dawn



Poems Submitted:


3(19 in total) poems



Poems Published:


0(7) poem



Live Performances:
0(2)


Interviews:
0(1)


Rejections:


0(8) poems

Thursday, September 8, 2016

New Poetry Says Podcast now with more Benjamin Dodds

Alice Allan has produced another podcast interview with Benjamin Dodds ( whose collection I reviewed way back here).
Please take a gander or a listen to the interview here at the Poetry Says blog.

Let Alice know what you think.

As podcaster myself getting comments from your listeners is gold.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Best American Poetry 2016 released

Buy from Booktopia
Not a poetry bargain but released today is the latest Best American Poetry.

Booktopia has it at 22% off and if you order with the code below before next monday, you can get free shipping.

The premier anthology of contemporary American poetry continues-guest edited this year by award-winning poet Edward Hirsch, a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and the president of The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.
The Best American Poetry series is "a vivid snapshot of what a distinguished poet finds exciting, fresh and memorable" (Robert Pinsky); a guiding light for the mood and shape of modern American poetry. 
Each year, this series presents essential American verse and the poets who create it. Truly the "best" American poetry has appeared in this venerable collection for over twenty-five years. 
A poet of decided brilliance since his 1981 debut collection, For the Sleepwalkers, Edward Hirsch curates a thoughtful selection of poetry for 2016 and an Introduction to be savored. Jumpha Lahiri said of Hirsch, "The trademarks of his poems areto be intimate but restrained, to be tender without being sentimental, to witness life without flinching, and above all, to isolate and preserve those details of our existence so often overlooked, so easily forgotten, so essential to our souls." Hirsch's choices for this collection reflect the soul of poetry in America. 
As ever, series editor David Lehman opens this year's edition with an insider's guide and a thoughtful contemplation of poetry today.



The FREE SHIPPING promotion code is: SUNSHINE


Simply place an order before midnight, Monday the 12th of September (AEST and NZST) with the promotion code SUNSHINE and you will receive free shipping on your order. The promotion code can be used as many times as you, or your family and friends, want on any orders between now and then.

The promotion code field where you enter the word SUNSHINE is on the last page of the checkout just before you complete your order (Payment and Review). Under Order Summary, click the plus symbol to expand the section so you can enter the code.

Please note: You may need to click the word "Apply" next to the promotion code field to receive your free shipping discount if it has not automatically applied it.


This offer is only available to Australian and New Zealand shipping addresses. If you are overseas and want to ship to an Australian or New Zealand address then you can use this promotional code too.

It is not applicable for Australia Post Express Post, eBooks, gift certificates OR magazines. The discount code applies only to the shipping cost of standard delivery to Australia or New Zealand and not to the overall order.

Poetry Bargains and Free Shipping Booktopia

That time again.

Booktopia has sent me an email saying they have free shipping until the 12th of September and I note that a couple of interesting titles have dropped into the bargain lists again.

So you can peruse the poetry bargains here.  Or look at those titles below that piqued my interest.

As the info below the line states you don't have to just use this for poetry but remember every time you buy a James Patterson book, a poet's soul shrinks.

Now this title below of Cavafy's was actually $9.50 when I ordered yesterday and I notice that its gone back up to $21.95. But after reading the blurb below I think it's still worth it.

Buy from Booktopia
CP Cavafy - The Collected Poems 
"A Greek gentleman in a straw hat, standing absolutely motionless at a slight angle to the universe." E. M. Forster's famous description of C. P. Cavafy--the most widely known and best loved modern Greek poet--perfectly captures the unique perspective Cavafy brought to bear on history and geography, sexuality and language. 
Cavafy wrote about people on the periphery, whose religious, ethnic and cultural identities are blurred, and he was one of the pioneers in expressing a specifically homosexual sensibility. His poems present brief and vivid evocations of historical scenes and sensual moments, often infused with his distinctive sense of irony. They have established him as one of the most important poets of the twentieth century. 
The only bilingual edition of Cavafy's collected poems currently available, this volume presents the most authentic Greek text of every poem he ever published, together with a new English translation that beautifully conveys the accent and rhythm of Cavafy's individual tone of voice. 
In addition, the volume includes an extensive introduction by Peter Mackridge, explanatory notes that gloss Greek historical names and events alluded to in the poems, a chronological list of the poems, and indexes of Greek and English titles.

And while we are on the topic of translated works This Intimate War Gallipoli / Canakkale 1915 by 
Robyn Rowland from 5 Islands Press is only $9.50.
By from Booktopia

These poems draw on works of history and private testimonial. They are what this age needs: poems about war which do not glorify war; poems which, for all their considerable rhetorical power, nowhere distance themselves from pain, brutality and callous error. Very few collections bring home so powerfully the vulnerability of individuals in the face of history. This collection certainly takes its place among Robyn Rowland's best work. It is a courageous achievement. 
- Lisa Gorton, Poetry editor, Australian Book Review

Dr. Robyn Rowland's poems are intensely felt and expressed. With an epic perspective and powerful emotionality, she has created a lasting and moving saga of the Anzac and Turkish warriors in conflict, as well as in intimate comradeship. Her perceptive sensitivity creates a vivid and enduring picture of the agonies, sufferings, and heroic acts that characterize the human tragedy of Gallipoli. In translating impeccably these poems into Turkish, Professor M.Ali Çelikel has commendably conveyed the epic depth and literary qualities embodied in the poems.
 - Professor Himmet Umunç Ph.D. Baskent University, President, English Language and Literature Research Association of Turkey.

Buy from Booktopia
David Harsent's, TS Eliot Prize Winning Fire Songs is also on special for $11.75

The poems in David Harsent's new collection, whether single poems, dramatic sequences, or poems that 'belong to one another', share a dark territory and a sometimes haunting, sometimes steely, lyrical tone.  

Throughout the book - in the stark biography of 'Songs from the Same Earth', the troubling fractured narrative of 'A Dream Book', the harrowing lines of connection in four poems each titled 'Fire', or the cheek-by-jowl shudder of 'Sang the Rat' - Harsent writes, as always, with passion and a sureness of touch. 

Asylum Nerves by Phillip Hammial (Published by Puncher and Wattmann) is also going for about half price - $11.95.

Work like this takes no prisoners. One either accedes right away to the energies and images one is confronted with, or one gets left behind. The poems are seldom explicitly contextualised, and he often elects not to invest them with the familiarising cues of emotion.
Sometimes only the event, the imaginative journey, is retained - as if to suggest that strangeness is pre-eminent, and affect accidental or secondary. Hammial, moreover, understands that the question of what we should feel about anything is much more difficult than we normally allow (it is one of the discomfiting things about his verse).

So that's it for the new specials. Enjoy!




The FREE SHIPPING promotion code is: SUNSHINE


Place an order before midnight, Monday the 12th of September (AEST and NZST) with the promotion code SUNSHINE and you will receive free shipping on your order. 

The promotion code can be used as many times as you, or your family and friends, want on any orders between now and then.

The promotion code field where you enter the word SUNSHINE is on the last page of the checkout just before you complete your order (Payment and Review). Under Order Summary, click the plus symbol to expand the section so you can enter the code.

Please note: You may need to click the word "Apply" next to the promotion code field to receive your free shipping discount if it has not automatically applied it.


This offer is only available to Australian and New Zealand shipping addresses. If you are overseas and want to ship to an Australian or New Zealand address then you can use this promotional code too.

It is not applicable for Australia Post Express Post, eBooks, gift certificates OR magazines. The discount code applies only to the shipping cost of standard delivery to Australia or New Zealand and not to the overall order.

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Year of Poetry Update - Week 35

Bought after listening to
Lisa's interview on Poetry Says.
This week saw the release of Tincture Issue 15 containing my poem Confusion and Showgirl Tunes (it's already counted in the stats from when it was accepted).  

I also was interviewed for the Poetry Says podcast by Alice Allan.  I will post the link when the interview surfaces in a couple of weeks.  

It was not so terrifying an experience being on the other end of the podcast mic ( in part due to Alice's calm demeanor and ability to put her guest at ease). I do note that I mentioned that I had a good run of acceptances this year and on checking my publications realized I have claimed one more publication than I actually have ie 7 instead of 8. 

Still this week felt like one big ball of poetry love.  





The Writing

This weeks inspiration came from a dream my wife.  She remembers quite clearly dreaming she was ticking a check box in answer to a census like form and the choice was:

you prefer a simple life because
decisions are made quickly
and the sun and moon are free

My wife is the first to admit she's an artist and not a poet but if she' dreaming this I am starting to wonder.  

I have managed to settle into the routine and hit the 4 hour mark that has become the norm this term.  I had a good session last Sunday and managed to squeeze in another 40 minutes close reading this afternoon.  I do have a long weekend coming up and intend to take full advantage of it.


The Study


I finished reading Denise Leveratov's On the Function of the Line, and found myself paying closer attention to line ending and its effect on the melody of the poem quite naturally.  I heartily recommend you find a copy.


Close Reading


I completed Spitfires by Claire Askew, which is a beautiful meditation on her grandfather's death ( I presume this is autobiographical but it's poetry...) and on how we chose to remember our loved ones. This is from her recent collection, This Changes Things, which I am finding an absolute joy to read.



For the Statbadgers:


Total time: 3:58 (375:43) hrs


poem writing = 2.00 (169:16) hrs

close reading =1:10(77:02) hrs

technique/theory 0:30(85:48) hrs

reflection = 0:30 (29:28) hrs



Poetry written:

0(33) poems completed


(1)16poems in draft


1 poem abandoned


1 poem facing execution at dawn



Poems Submitted:


0(16 in total) poems



Poems Published:


0(7) poem



Live Performances:
0(2)


Interviews:
1(1)


Rejections:


0(8) poems

Friday, September 2, 2016

Tincture Issue 15 - Now with more me

Buy at Tincture or Kobo.
Tincture Journal Issue 15 - Spring 2016 has been released featuring a poem by yours truly and a lot of other great writers/poets.

Cast your eyes over the names in the table of contents below:


  • Editorial, by Daniel Young
  • Making Noise: Part Three, by Megan McGrath
  • Saving Daniel, by Lucie Britsch
  • Slingshot, by David Adès
  • I Dream of Marie, by Christina Tang-Bernas
  • Fragment: Tuesday Evening, Waitan, by Ella Jeffery
  • Whale Song, by Ben Armstrong
  • Bonbon, by Joe Baumann
  • Chiang Mai, by S. K. Kelen
  • Too Big to Hold in Your Heart, by Rachel Watts
  • Carnival Flesh, by Elisabeth Murray
  • The Wild West, by Anthony Lawrence
  • Seventeen Ruminations About Bottles and Other Matters, Some Weighty, Some Frivolous, by David Murcott
  • Ethic, by Chris Lynch and a rawlings
  • The Lollipop Lady Who Liked Order and Balance, by Martine Kropkowski
  • Confusion and Showgirl Tunes, by SB Wright
  • What Happens in Indiana, by Ellie White
  • The Holy Foolishness of Punk, by Susan Bradley Smith
  • The Juniper Tree, by Vivien Huang
  • When I Meet the Zhou Family, by Mindy Gill
  • Roadrunner, by Liam Lowth
  • Fullas, by Ramon Loyola
  • My Boy Dalya, by Jov Almero
  • Morphology, by Scott-Patrick Mitchell
  • The Gift of Books and the Night, by Lachlan Brown
Pretty happy to have made the grade with this poem.  If you would like to support a great journal that pays its contributors why not purchase a Tincture or even perhaps invest in a 4 issue Subscription.


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